May 11, 2022

Real Estate NFTs with Joe Jesuele


HomeJab is America’s most popular and reliable on-demand professional HDR real estate photography and video service for real estate pros. Lightning-fast high-end visual production offerings also include immersive 3D interactive tours, floorplan creation, affordable virtual staging, and turnkey aerial services. HomeJab’s efficient one-stop-shop features affordable and customizable shoots that create the most engaging visual content for marketing your property. HomeJab is available in every major US market in all 50 states.

Joe Jesuele is at once a real estate entrepreneur, internet efficiency innovator, passionate problem solver, and one of the nation's top real estate visual content experts.



Joe is the founder and CEO of HomeJab, America’s most popular and reliable on-demand professional real estate photography and video marketplace for real estate pros. Joe oversees an operation that has delivered more than 4,000,000 images to help agents sell and rent more than $35 billion in listings.



Born and raised in Hillsdale, NJ, Joe graduated from Villanova University with a BA in economics and a minor in entrepreneurship. He started his real estate career at Marcus & Millichap, a top commercial brokerage firm, as an investment broker. His life-long career in real estate includes co-founding an online mortgage company as well as building new homes and marketing them for sale, which led to the creation of HomeJab.

Transcript

Josh:

Good day, fellow dealmakers. Welcome to the deal scout on today's show. We're going to talk about aerial photography and a really cool business that has made a dent nationwide, helping people, mostly listing agents, brokers, and people who help buy and sell lots of properties or who own lots of properties do more deals. Ladies and gentlemen. Welcome Joe to the show, Joe. Welcome in.

Joe:

Thanks Josh. It's great to be with you. Thank you so much for inviting me.

Josh:

Yeah. All right. Tell us about what we're going to be talking today. What's the name of your business and what do you guys do?

Joe:

Well, I run a home jab, a home jet.com. It's an online marketplace for real estate photography, but we all, we do all sorts of different types of media productions. Videos, aerials, 3d tours, floor plans, anything you need in order to list a property for sale or for rent, you'd go on our platform. It's like an on demand, Uber type of thing, where you put in the date and time. The order goes out to all the photographers in that area. We have over 1300 throughout the country and in Canada. One of the photographers will accept the job and you'll get a confirmation. All this usually happens within a few seconds. It's an on-demand platform for high quality media production. As soon as the shoe's done talking for uploads the files back into our system, and then they go to editors and write back to you usually first thing the next morning. So it's a very fast turnaround time. We're essentially a very efficient, fast assembly line for really busy real estate professionals.

Josh:

Super cool. Let's just say I have a hundred listings and some of the higher end stuff that has more meat on the bones. I want to get you to do maybe Ariel, maybe a 3d walkthrough or, those kinds of things. Now I put the bid on there does do I have to then start negotiating prices and interviewing people and going through that whole process? What does that look like?

Joe:

No, you don't have to interview anyone. It's just a very simple scheduling process. I mean, home jab is kind of known for the simplicity of it. You go to our website, you click schedule a shoot and you literally just click the different services that you want. If you want photos and video at an aerials, whatever the combination of things is, you just click to add those things in and then you see the price pop up and calculate right there. You go to step two, put in the address, put in the instructions, put in the date and time, and then you submit the order and that's basically it. There's not, I mean, you can order a schedule shoots in less than a minute, and then you get confirmation, like I said, within seconds usually. And it's a very fast, simple process.

Josh:

I could check the prices and I can go through this process and I go, oh, okay. That makes sense. I'll add this service. Or, or maybe, Hey, I didn't know, was going to be this, affordable I'll add on other stuff. I could do that all on the website don't even need to talk to someone.

Joe:

That's right. It like an Allah cart type of thing? You, just click photos, click video, click area, whatever you want, whatever combination you just add them into your, into the cart, so to speak. The you'll see the quote just appear. You can take things out, put things in, get to where you want to be in terms of price, and then go ahead and schedule it. So it's, you know, very straightforward,

Josh:

Super cool, good job, Joe. I was, were doing a, a shoot for some student housing projects that were working on and we did the aerial. We had a drone and were trying to figure that out. That this was a long time ago when drones first started and then we hired a photographer to walk through and it was a complete hassle on my part. I'm not, I'm a broker, I'm a real estate guy. I'm a transaction guy doing that kind of stuff. I was just like from now on. I'll never do that. So I'm glad I found you. I want to know more about how you got this started. It's a brilliant idea. I'm super interested. How did you, how'd you get going, man?

Joe:

Well, I I've, I guess about 10 years ago, I was in real estate. I was building houses actually, and this was during the great recession. And so the market wasn't that strong. I was building these houses in Philly where I lived and it was an up and coming neighborhood, but, the houses were super high-end and I just wanted to make sure that, I would sell the property. I was trying to get into doing things on the marketing end that no one else was doing. I was, I taught myself how to do like 3d modeling of, off of blueprints and just , have a fly through a 3d model even before we started building it to kind of, jumpstart the marketing plan. Once it was built, I did the aerials, I did the video tour pretty much, everything there so that, we can sell the house and, everything worked out pretty well. It was through the process of still selling my own houses that I realized that, there's really a business here because no other real estate agents were doing this at the time. The walkthrough videos, any video production was very expensive to hire a professional. No one knew like where to go to do it. We started rolling out, walkthrough videos in Philadelphia and then growing out to the suburbs and then going down to DC and to Florida and start slowly growing it. And, were one of the first companies that were able to bundle in photos and video at a very reasonable price that like, the $200 price point and things just , started to grow from there. It was really based off of my own experience as a investor developer builder and selling my own houses. That kind of got me into it.

Josh:

Got it. Now, technical questions. Let's talk equipment and such. Are you a Mac or PC of guy?

Joe:

I've always been a PC guy.

Josh:

All right. You're walking around with a Android or a windows phone. Do they still have windows phones by the way?

Joe:

Actually, my phone is now. I just, I just got an iPhone for the first time in a while, so I, but my desktop PC, but I have an iPhone.

Josh:

Okay. Copy, copy. All right. Did you, when you first got into aerial stuff, so you were doing, you were swinging hammers and working with construction, great recession happened. You're like, oh s**t. I got to find a way to make some money and sell these homes and do this kind of stuff. You're like, what if I offered this as a service? Right. Did you start out with, so I guess there's two questions there that I kind of posed is when did you start taking on your first external client? Cause you were doing this for yourself. What did that look like? I want to know how you got into the drone stuff. So, but let's start first external client other than, what you were trying to do for yourself.

Joe:

Yeah. I mean, we started like really small. I literally just called up, the agents that I knew that were operating in the neighborhood that I was living in and it just offered to do it for them for free. It was a totally free service just to test it out. We did a bunch of just free videos for people learning the process of how to, shoot it, how to walk through the house and kind of simulate an actual walkthrough, took a little trial and error to get there and, the editing process and how we kind of came up with a workflow that was scalable. It was like just totally a freebie, just to the agents that I knew. And, and that's how I got started. It was a very slow, no money. It was just like, is this something that people want, and, 10 years ago, like YouTube was pretty big at that point. Like doing video is like a kind of a new thing, and streaming it online. There wasn't a ton of people. Actually the big agents at the time were the videos that they were doing were actually just slideshows of photos. So, you might might remember these, like the, the photo kind of just like with zoom in and out and move around and then you see the next photo and that, that was what people thought were videos. So, so that was who we were competing with for those like software companies that were doing these photo slideshows.

Josh:

Yeah. I, I used to do that cause I would, when I would list the property, I would go take a bunch of pictures and then I would turn it into a slide show. I think I was using like one of the first instances of like PowerPoint that had transitions. Ken burns a fax zoom in zoom out. It was terrible. Like, I wouldn't sit through that, but those kinds of presentations actually helped me get the listing. Right. Cause I would go take a bunch of pictures and I showed this presentation. So that was super cool. You actually were one of the first to kind of get into the video aspect. You would, walk around one of those huge cameras back in the day and then uploaded and edit in such like that. At what point did you start to go, I'm going to get paid to do this. Like, this is going to be my focus. I'm not going to swing hammers anymore.

Joe:

It's a good question. I think, it was, I wanted to get into a business that was online and something that would be able to like scale up and be like a national thing. I was like, yeah, just building houses, that I, I didn't, I want to do something different also. It was like, I wanted to get into an online business, stay in within real estate, but then again, do something that was more scalable and that's how I made the decision. I was like, yeah, we can, there's obviously a huge market for it, for this. No, one's really doing walkthrough videos right now, virtual tours and drones and all that. And, and so, we could just do this free model here in the city and then, start expanding and scale it into every market. You know? It was, it seemed like a, a big enough market and something that no one else was doing at the time.

Josh:

Super cool. All right. Now let's talk about drones, right? You get your first drone and you're like, I'm going to test this out and see if I can sell some aerial footage. What did that look like? Cause when drones first started, there wasn't any FAA rules. There wasn't any, no fly zones. There wasn't any pilot license rules and all that other crap. It was the wild west. Like what was your experience getting into the drones?

Joe:

Yeah. I mean, this is a few years later, like, so we started with walkthrough, videos and photos, and then a few years later, people were like started to buy drones and it became like this thing. And, and yeah, it was like the wild west in terms of like, there was no regulations and no one knew like what licensing you needed. People started talking about, well, you need to get approval from the FAA. There was like a lot of confusion around it. There was some photography companies that didn't even get into it really, because of that reason, they want to understand the regulatory environment first, but honestly, like we never had that viewpoint. I, I was just, we just were pushed forward with it. And, and did it even before there was regulations in place quite honestly. So, just yeah, we just, it was just move forward with it aggressively. Once the FDA put out certain guidelines for, how to get licensed, then we adopted that. It was, it was just like, whatever goes in and beginning.

Josh:

Yeah. Are you a preset, a pretty decent pilot or operator on those things?

Joe:

I mean, not really because like right now, like my job is basically just sitting in the office kind of dealing with like a bunch of administrative stuff. So, I mean, we have 1300 photographers and I'm not even one of them anymore, so I, I wouldn't even, I haven't flown a drone and years to be honest, I mean, it's really just become like a software platform and like, kind of dealing with like technical stuff and, yeah. Just stuff like that. Like sales and marketing and administrative stuff.

Josh:

Yeah. Your job became inside. You're going around and you started doing walkthroughs and you started doing these things and you saw that your niche was for listing agents and brokers who were doing, transactions and renting properties and apartments and such like that. Have you tried to crack into a vertical or an industry that just wasn't well received? And, you mentioned you have a, a very large national partner, that you've acquired too. Like, how did you find your fit through this business process?

Joe:

Well, a lot of the big customers actually came to us. I, we didn't have like, our, our main marketing plan was just to reach out to, the, the listing agents that you started residential. We started, going after commercial agents, but these large enterprise companies that needed that they had a different problem. Like they were doing photography and video, but they were in like all these different markets. They had to try to find like a national company to take photography off their plate. Like they would go into different cities and try to find photographers. It was just as they got bigger and bigger, that became an administrative issue. Like they didn't want to attempt to deal with that anymore. Just dealing with one company like us just made it really easy for them, to kind of do like hundreds of shoots in all these different cities. The larger customers, kind of found us and, and asked us, like if, if we can work with them because, just when you scale up and you're in all these markets, it becomes a, a headache.

Josh:

So, yeah, it's a great idea as you building this out. Right. You're doing deals and now you're seeing things, from aerial to 3d modeling to like the virtual tours. What's the, kind of the difference between those two things like a 3d modeling where you can kind of see it in a virtual tool. Cause I don't know.

Joe:

Yeah. I mean, like after drones became very popular, then soon after that people started getting into more of the 3d virtual tour stuff. So, there was Matterport that they came out with a camera and it really, the main difference is like, if you're watching a walkthrough video, you're just kind of sitting back, watching a video, very passive, just kind of, just watching a video. With the virtual tour, you're able to kind of click and go where you want to go in the house. Some people really like that because they get to control where they go, they can kind of zoom in and stuff and look at like the details of things. Other people, they don't want to be bothered with having to like click through a house and, on their computer and stuff, they just want to watch a video. The video is a lot more popular, especially, just with the average person, and the average agent, but, and then, after the whole pandemic started, of course, like the virtual stuff in 3d stuff became more. It's like 10%, 15% of our business, but video is still a lot more popular, but it's really just the difference of like, just watching a bit of video as a passive viewer and then being very active and having to like click through the house and being more in control of it. It was sort of a personal decision.

Josh:

Super cool. What was the biggest project that has come across your all's plate? You've been doing this for 10 years.

Joe:

Yeah. About 10 years now.

Josh:

Right. What's the biggest project that you guys have worked on?

Joe:

Oh, well, we've done a lot of shopping centers and, big residential multifamily projects and things like that. There was one project that we're dealing with, like this, this bank or a company that actually works for the bank. They just have huge portfolios of these houses that are, in bad shape, they're , foreclosures and whatnot. They're all over the country and there's just hundreds of them. Like kind of just dealing with helping them, just dispose of all those properties and going out to all of these various cities throughout the country. I mean, that was a pretty big project, but done a lot of stuff in actually industrial as well. We had a big customer who markets to all these different suppliers throughout the country and they have these gigantic warehouses and manufacturing facilities. So, we're taking videos of everyone working on the different machines and like, the whole facility, it's like hundreds of thousands of square feet. So, we've shot all different kinds of properties, these large super centers and small apartments and everything in between.

Josh:

Yeah. Super cool job. Nice work, man. This is really a great idea. One of my favorite things to do not favorite things to do. Like one of my fun things to do is every once in a while, like, I'll go on like a YouTube and I'll watch like a Google maps, the cars that drive by and they take pictures. Every once in a while, something funny pops up. You guys have done hundreds of these kinds of projects, 1300 photographers. I'm sure every once in awhile, a something like a video or a picture comes by that you guys go well, that shouldn't be out into the world. Like give us an example of, things that you guys might have seen come across your plate that you're like, that needs to, we might need to get that one erased.

Joe:

Well, when you walk into someone's house, what I mean? You never know what kind of condition you think, like when they're selling the house, everything is staged perfectly and everything is like, in perfect condition. Like, usually it's not, I mean, usually there, the homeowner's not ready, there's just garbage everywhere. I mean, that's a very frequent thing at one time there's actually like, there's there'd be like squatters in the house. The house is vacant and we walk in there and there's just like people actually living in the house that shouldn't be there, it's people in really bad shape and, and that kind of thing. So it's it. Yeah. You just walk into a house and you never know, what, you're going to, what you're going to find in there. Usually we actually did a survey on this. Like more than half the time, the homeowners are not prepared, not ready and just, we get there to do the shoot and they're just like, they need a half hour just to kind of get ready. It's, yeah, it, it, you get in situations with like all the Houser and many different kinds of conditions, and some of them are even like an unsafe to go into haven't been lived in for awhile. So, so there's a lot of those situations, unfortunately.

Josh:

Yeah. I can imagine, the, my job as podcast host is to ask the questions that pop to my crazy head and then also the listeners, cause they're like, what what'd you do in this situation? You show up in the house and there might be some squatters and you might be working for a bank who said, Hey, go take a look at some of our portfolio. And you walk in. You're like, well, Nope, closing that door at nine 11 or whatever, call the bank. Like, how do you do this as, being a business owner and running 1300 photographers across U S and Canada dealing with that kind of stuff, how do you negotiate that or navigate that? I should say,

Joe:

Yeah. I mean, everyone has their own idea about what, what's safe. What's not, so, I mean, really just rely on the photographers, if they're, if they feel unsafe about something or, they, and we just, tell them to leave. There's really no pressure, it's just a, it's just a photo shoot. It's not, it doesn't have to become this life or death thing, ? And, and so we're doing like thousands of sheets every month. It really doesn't matter, if you feel unsafe or anything, just leave. We rely on the photographers quite a bit, and, we work with some of some amazing people and, it's not easy. Like, you're out there fighting traffic all day, like driving around, doing three, four shoots a day in all different parts of the city. You, you get to the house and you don't know what kind of conditional mood the people are going to be in. Who's going to be there. It's not the easiest job, and then you come home and you have to upload all this footage and stuff and do everything again the next day. So, especially with gas prices now where they are and everything kind of going up, it's a tough job. And, and we really rely on, the photographers quite a bit, and the stuff that they have to deal with is you have to have the right mentality, I think, to kind of, to be a real estate photographer. I mean, you gotta really be able to deal with all different kinds of people.

Josh:

Yeah, totally. No, I, that my brain, my wife does some photographer, like photography stuff, but she likes like weddings or babies or stuff like that. Like, there's no way my wife would want to do real estate photography for those kinds of reasons. Like you might show up in a house and they're like, we're not ready to go, come back in two hours. You're like, no, what am I going to do with my time? I'm not a super cool being able to manage that as a business owner, incredible job, Joe, like that, for me, that would be a logistical headache, which makes it a great idea for me to pay that kind of stuff. Because if I have a bunch of listings or if I'm working with a fund and we're trying to do a bunch of projects, having you take care of that is like a huge burden off our back. Do, do people use you for due diligence? Right. At a state investor at a state portfolio holder, they want, they're exploring a property and they want you to do fly throughs or walk through so they can, their investors can look at it. One might be in New York, one might be in Canada, whatever. Do you ever do stuff like that?

Joe:

Every once in awhile? Yeah. W we don't really ask people like the purpose, we just to kind of assume that they might be selling the house, but yeah. There's definitely situations inspection type of companies, insurance companies. Don't of work with them, kind of documenting damage, on the roof and stuff like that, using the drones. There are some assignments like that builders that want to kind of check out, the land where they're going to be building, or just, it's a very large property than the, certainly a need for like drone footage and stuff like that there. So, so yeah, there's, there's of that.

Josh:

Very cool. As a part of this program, like this show, what I like to do is sometimes I ask some questions off a card just to throw things off and then to just create some creativity. Tell me when to stop. I'll ask you one of these questions. I'll have some fun.

Joe:

Stop.

Josh:

All right, here we go. That was actually an instruction card. All right. So here we go. It says, if everyone had to decide on their career path at age six, what would you be doing right now? Would you be doing aerial photography, 3d modeling, and such like that age six?

Joe:

Oh no. I, I would be the Senator fielder of the New York Yankees probably, or the quarterback of the giants. Yeah. Okay. That's what I would be doing.

Josh:

Got it. You like sports, but didn't work out for you. You, you wound up in construction and flying drones.

Joe:

Yeah. Yeah. Like everyone else, at some point, you realize, there's only so far, you can go with this. For me, that was a, that was high school.

Josh:

Got it. As you're working through these deals back to deals, as you're working through these deals and you're seeing all these orders come across, you get the benefit of seeing trends. You get to see trends and things that are buying, selling things that are new construction, things that are going under. What kind of trends in real estate do you, from your perspective on the other side of the computer?

Joe:

Well, one interesting thing, this is an internal like, report that we did just recently, as we looked at, like what people are spending on marketing, like photography and video and everything before the pandemic and after the pandemic, which is kind of interesting. It, and it lined up with the politics of the state. If you look at like red states and blue states, so the blue states, ended up spending a lot more money on video and virtual tours after the pandemic started, the red states, some of them ended up just spending the same or even less. It was kind of interesting, like, so these blue states that were the ones that had a lot of restrictions and like really forced the regulations, people couldn't go out and see these properties. The virtual tours became a very big thing. Instead of going actually in person to see the property and they spent, more and more money on what we're doing on photography, whereas, the red states seemed like Texas, for example, they stayed exactly the same, no change at all from before the pandemic, after the pandemic. I just thought that was interesting, because it was, it had a direct impact on our business, but also just the way that people, sold their houses and kind of dealt with marketing their deals, it was kind of, it kind of coincided with w with the politics of the local areas that they were in.

Josh:

Yeah. I mean, it makes, I wouldn't have thought of that until you brought it up, but it makes absolute sense. Like when the world was on lockdown, if someone's looking to buy a house, they want to see what the house looks like. Virtual walkthroughs for probably that was probably a good year. Now when the pandemic, before the pandemic happened. And then right. When it launched, what were your thoughts? Were you nervous? Like, how were you nervous? How were you approaching that? How did you fare during it?

Joe:

Yeah. Well, I mean, when things first hit in the March, April, I mean, no one knew what was going to happen. Whether, were going to be able to continue doing business or not. There was a period of time when like, no one was doing anything just because they didn't want to get into trouble. The thing is though that, our customers real estate agents, they have to do deals, I mean, that's how they make money. We kind of knew that, yeah, there was going to be this few weeks, period of time when people would just kind of, we're going to wait to see what happened. Eventually, we started up again, even when things were kind of locked down, were still going into houses, we have rules around like, who can also, no one else can be in the house. It was just the photographer and like, really messed up and all that. It was a thing where it was like, like you said, I mean, you couldn't go to actual open houses. The only way to see the property was virtually. So, w we continued the business. Even though there was like a S it was about a few weeks where things, really slowed down, it kind of was this, like V-shaped thing, like that happened later in the year towards like the end of spring, early summer, where were back to doing a lot of deals, because, people still needed to sell their houses. They still needed to do deals, but the only way they can sell it was like, online virtually. They kind of needed us to get in there anyway.

Josh:

Yeah. Where are you, where are you going next? Right. You got into 3d, you got walked through, you got aerial, you got outside photography and, like, what are some other innovations and disruptors that you think will come on the market or that you're heading towards next?

Joe:

Well, we actually just got into NFTs, like a lot of people and blockchain, ? So, so customers have always asked us, do we have stock images of, city skylines, downtown areas, things that they can add to their, their portfolio. And, we never had stock images, but we recently just launched a, an NFT marketplace. We went to all of our photographers and asked them to upload all their best photos of the cities and the towns that they lived in. And, and we mentored them into NFTs that are on the blockchain and could be sold and as NFTs. The reason we did that was, I wanted to do something innovative in blockchain as was always interested in the blockchain technology. But, but also, unlike stock photo companies where the money kind of just go to those companies, not the photographer, like the average photographer just makes like 25 cents per photo, per month working for stock photo companies. Whereas with NFTs, they get paid directly. So, all the money that gets paid for these empties flows, right. To the photographer. And, we're not talking about like thousands of dollars to buy these images. A lot of the stock photos that we're selling as NFTs are like, 10, $20. It's a very reasonable amount that people could come on and purchase these NFTs. Then, they can use them on their website and their marketing, and then they can sell them on the marketplace, resell them. If they resell it, they can get their money back. When they resell it, the original photographer gets a commission on that secondary sale. So, which is pretty cool because all that happens automatically on the blockchain. So using a smart contract. That's that was a new thing that we just actually launched this week.

Josh:

Wow. This is super, my timing is impeccable, huh?

Joe:

Yeah, yeah. I didn't think you were going to go there, but yeah, we just started that this week and it's a brand new thing, NFTs and in real estate, photography has never been done before. A lot of people in the real estate industry I think are kind of interested in it, but probably not so into crypto yet. We're, we're a little early with this, but I think, the whole concept of NFTs, which essentially it's like a certificate of authenticity that you have an image direct from the creator direct from that photographers, it's not, no one took a copy of a JPEG and you're not stealing it off the internet or something. It's, it's just a certificate of authenticity. That means that, you actually purchased it from the actual photographer and, and, paid that photographer. Again, it's not, you don't have to, they're not thousands of dollars. It's, 10, $20, $50, whatever the image, the photographers get to put a, price it out, however they want to. And, and we have over, I think, close to 700 NFTs right now, minted all over the country.

Josh:

Nice work, man. This is super exciting. Super interesting. So, as a photographer, my wife could go out, take an awesome picture of Florida, right? Like somewhere in Florida, Ocala, like that's where we live. She can take an awesome picture, upload it minted as an FTE. I don't even know what this stuff means, to be honest. Someone could go and buy it. She gets a, she gets some money and if they resell it, she gets a commission.

Joe:

Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Yeah. That's the cool thing. It's like, it creates this opportunity to have this secondary market that's never existed in photography really. I mean, if a photographer was to sell an image, like that would be it, that would be the transaction. And, but now if you buy an image, you want to use that image. Like if you need a skyline shot of, Chicago or something for your website, if you're a local business in Chicago and you can, you need downtown shots for your website, you can purchase these as NFTs and then, you can sell them and get new photos. You're, so you're almost refreshing the images that you have selling some buying others, and each time you buy and sell the original photographer gets a royalty on that. It's a way to support photographers. And, but at the same time, it gives people a, an active marketplace to buy and sell the stock images.

Josh:

Yeah. Super cool. All right. Do you mind if I asked you some NFT questions? Cause I have no clue what the heck they do and all right. The example takes a picture of the Ocala, right? Downtown Ocala puts it up, gets minted as an NFT. Someone buys it 20 bucks. What's T like, could my wife, is there, can she sell it again? Or that's now the ownership of that person acquiring it?

Joe:

The, I mean the original photographer can mint another NFTE. They may retain the copyrights for the photograph, but the buyer of that NFT can use now has usage rights for that image. So, they don't have to do any like licensing deals or they don't have to sign any con. They ha they only entity. That's like a contract that they have the rights to use that image for commercial purposes on their website, or, a Facebook ad or whatever they want to do on social media. They can use that image for commercial purposes. It gives them the usage rights. When they're done using it, they can sell it on our marketplace to someone else, for the same price for more, whatever they want to prep, whatever they want to list it at and then get their money back and buy another one. It's think of it like baseball cards, almost like you can like buy and sell, trade your, your images kind of keep your content fresh. Instead of buying like one of like many images from a stock photo company, you're getting a unique photo, that was photographed by this photographer. When you sell it, that original photographer gets paid a commission again, anywhere from 1% to 10%, whatever the photographer puts on that, sets, it sets a royalty for that NFT.

Josh:

Super cool man. That going to be through home J*p or did you stand up a new company for that? Or just, is it a product.

Joe:

Right now? It is. It's part of our company home jab, if you can go to MFT dot home jet.com, but w there's a new brand, we're calling it real. Then, so it's the real NFT marketplace and we'll probably have, that particular brand be its own company. We're just in the very beginning stages of rolling it out and stuff. Yeah, it'll probably be a separate thing.

Josh:

Awesome. Awesome. Awesome. On the home jab front, right. Someone could go to your website, they could type this in. Our deal-makers on here, we have a lot of real estate players on here fund managers, investors, brokers. Someone could go in, go to home jab, they could type in their information and it spits out a price and they could just go, yes. And then the process has taken over. They get to see the uploaded videos at the end of the day, right? What is the largest transaction you guys have ever seen, like massive industrial, lots of pictures, aerial, flyovers, whatever, what was the largest transaction you guys ever did on the photography 3d modeling front?

Joe:

Well, again, this, just this week, we were, did a very large multimillion dollar property in Yellowstone, Wyoming, near Yellowstone park, very exclusive neighborhood. And it's very expensive property. That ended up being a couple of days, having to fly someone in that was $1,800 plus all the travel costs involved. That was like at super high end, usually. I mean, we're, most of our shoots are like two to $300. That's really the sweet spot most of the agents are dealing with. Yeah, if you have like a full day shoot, or multiple day, it could be a thousand dollars or more than that. That's a rare case, usually, the average house probably, 230, $250.

Josh:

Sweet. Did you guys in, at Yellowstone, did you do like a Dutton ranch fly over for the,

Joe:

Yeah. A lot of drone work. Yeah. A lot, a lot of aerial stuff. I actually haven't seen the footage yet. This happened just yesterday night, so, but yeah, it's a very, it's a lot of drone stuff and kind of get a sense for how large the property is. And, but, same type of thing. Like we would do on like a golf course or a farm or something like that. Sometimes it's just, there's multiple acres involved and it just kind of takes all day to kind of get through it.

Josh:

Very cool. All right. Two more questions, unless you have something that I completely missed. One is, if someone's out there, they want to do a deal with you, connect with you. What's a good way for them to find you connect with you and maybe do a deal with you.

Joe:

Well, you go to going to our website is definitely the best way it's home jet.com and then yeah, there's when you get to that, there's really just two buttons, right on the top one is schedule a shoot and you can just click that and put in whatever you want and schedule it right there. Or there's a contact button and you can just contact us if you have any things custom, or you want to talk to someone, schedule a call or whatever. Very simple, straightforward, pretty much everyone is just goes to the website and they either schedule online or they can contact us directly. We'll, either we can, send us an email or set up a phone call. Okay.

Josh:

I lied a few more questions, home, jab. Where, where does the job come in? What w how did you come up with that?

Joe:

Well, I, I mean, I really liked the word home. I liked the idea of being at home and it's just seemed like a nice word to use. And so I needed something else. Cause home.com wasn't available at the time. So expensive, it's very expensive. I started to go through like three letter suffixes that I can add to home and something that was available. I didn't have to spend a lot of money on, so got to jab. I was like, well, that's easy to spell. I kinda, I'm into like boxing and MMA and, we're, we go out fast, get everything done quickly. It's an, a very short, quick thing. Like, yeah, that makes sense to me. So that's how we got to it.

Josh:

It was inspired by boxing and MMA. I love it. Love it. You didn't want to spend, a couple of million dollars on home.com. Perfect.

Joe:

Sense.

Josh:

What question should I have asked you during this interview that I screwed up and didn't ask you?

Joe:

Well, I think we covered a lot. I'm happy we got into the NFTs. I didn't, I didn't think you were going to get into that, but that was a whole new thing. I just, just to clarify, I guess, like the types of properties, I know you have a lot of people on here from that are doing all different kinds of deals and we're, we're just like all over the place in terms of properties. We've done, multi-family retail office, industrial, obviously residential houses and stuff like that, vacant land. It's really like, we've also done like portraits headshots for certain customers and neighborhood videos, flyovers of different, cities and things. Even like custom shoots like that, we could get into, so whatever you guys need, for marketing, any type of footage, you can reach out to us and we'll get it done. I mean, we have, everyone's a real estate photographer on our platform, but they also do a lot of other things, like they're very creative people. Some are doing weddings and other commercials and feature films, even. It's, we, anything you need done, I mean, you can reach out to us and we'll figure something out.

Josh:

Super cool. Thanks, Joe, fellow dealmakers, listening in, if you need some pictures, some walkthroughs, some videos, some aerials, any of that stuff, even NFTs for picture stuff. I don't even know what that means. If you need that. Or if that interests, you reach out to our guests and say, thank you for being on the show, sharing your information and find a way to do a deal with them. I know that NFTs are hot, even though I don't understand it. There's a lot of people who do my encouragement to you is connect with our guests. That's the mission and purpose of the show. It's connect, cool deal makers with other deal makers, to do a deal connect with our guests. Say thank you and find a way to do a deal with them. If you want to work on a deal or talk about a deal here on the show, head on over to the deal. Scout.com, fill out a quick form and put me on the hunt to a scout for the next deal. Talk to you all on the next episode. See it. Where's this button. It always hides from me at the last minute front of the camera. All right. See you, Joe.

Joe Jesuele Profile Photo

Joe Jesuele

Founder and CEO of HomeJab

Joe Jesuele is at once a real estate entrepreneur, internet efficiency innovator, passionate problem solver, and one of the nation's top real estate visual content experts.

Joe is the founder and CEO of HomeJab, America’s most popular and reliable on-demand professional real estate photography and video marketplace for real estate pros. Joe oversees an operation that has delivered more than 4,000,000 images to help agents sell and rent more than $35 billion in listings.

Born and raised in Hillsdale, NJ, Joe graduated from Villanova University with a BA in economics and a minor in entrepreneurship. He started his real estate career at Marcus & Millichap, a top commercial brokerage firm, as an investment broker. His life-long career in real estate includes co-founding an online mortgage company as well as building new homes and marketing them for sale, which led to the creation of HomeJab.